MAILBAG

These are actual questions sent to
Dr. Frederick J. Nau.
Send your questions to:
drnau@implantdentistry.com

 

 Home

Coatings

Older Patients

Full Upper

Implant Life Span

Cost

Insurance

Younger Patients

More FAQs

 

Home

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top of Page

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More FAQs

 

 

Home

 

 

 

Top of Page

 

To: implantdentistry@implantdentistry.com

(1) My dentist has recommended a basic bridge. I know that my natural tooth - the soon to be the pontic tooth- is going to be extracted. Should I infer that I will recieve a dental implant to support the pontic? I am little confused as to why I would need both an implant and a bridge. If it is helpful, the afflicted area is the upper-right back, and the soon to be extracted tooth is the penultimate one.

(2) On-line fee quotes will usually say "dental implant" and give the cost (approx. $1250), should I assume that this covers the crown

Ms. Smith

Dear Ms. Smith

(1) Traditionally a "three-unit bridge" and "single-tooth implant" are mutually exclusive terms.
(2) Implants and crowns are two separate entities.
Your dentist is your best source of information since every case is different.

To: implantdentistry@implantdentistry.com

I am considering dental implants. I have heard that available implants have a variety of different types of surfaces. What are your recommendation concerning coated implants. I am particularly concerned with the negative effects associated with hydroxylapatite coatings?

Are my concerns warranted?

Thank you.

Robert

Dear Robert,

Your concerns are valid,because HA (HYROXYLAPETITE) will dissolve in an acidic environment. HA is indicated, however, in porous bone in situations where the implant will be completely surrounded by bone (no acid attack). Here HA has an advantage over other surfaces because HA appears to have a higher initial success rate in porous bone. Another surface that is used is TPS (titanium plasma spray). It has some advantages of a roughened surface and does not degrade significantly.

Dr. Frederick J. Nau

 

To: implantdentistry@implantdentistry.com

Our mother is 73 yrs. young and always is uncomfortable with her dentures. She has trouble chewing, etc. She has been contemplating implants for several years. Do you feel this is a good idea for her at her age? We are concerned about the healing period of 4-6 months.

Can you enlighten us a little??

Thank you.

 

Donna

To: Donna

Please note that age in and of itself is not a factor in the choice of treatment. General health and attitude are much more important in the decision to use dental implants.

 

Dr. Frederick J. Nau

Dear Dr. Nau,

I am a 42 years old and have worn upper dentures for 20 years. Is it possible to do implants on the entire upper mouth? If so how much time is involved and would I ever be in a situation where I would be without teeth during the procedure?

 

Thank you

Dana

To: Dana, Dana@

 

Depending on the remaining bone left, it could be possible. A panoramic radiograph is needed to see the amount of bone left. Also since you are young the benefits are even greater. Depending on the surgeon you may have to be without teeth from one day to as long as a week. The healing of the implants in the bone takes from 4-6 months.

Thank You for visiting my site.

Dr. Frederick J. Nau

 


 

To: implantdentistry@implantdentistry.com
Dear Doctor

What is the life span of a dental implant? I am twenty-six years old and wonder about the longevity of
these devices.

Charles

Dear Charles,

The first "osseo-integrated" implant placed in the mouth by Dr. Branemark is still in function today
(32 years years later).The generally accepted figure for bone loss around such "fixture" is .1 mm bone loss per
year . Conceivably, a 12mm implant could then be in function for forty years. This conservative estimate does not
consider further advances in the science of dentistry and orthopedics. Also consider the alternative. A three unit bridge
according to insurance companies, will be replaced on an average of every ten years. The implant prosthetic crown may
have to be replaced every ten years as well, but the restoration only involves one tooth.

Dr. Frederick J. Nau
30 Central Park South
New York, NY 10019


To:implantdentistry@implantdentistry.com
Dear Sir/Madam.

I was reading some articles on tooth implants and was wondering what the
age limits were to having this kind of treatment done.

Thanking You..
Dan..


Dear Dan,

Anyone in good health is a possible candidate for dental implants.
There are a few absolute contraindications to the surgery, however.
They include uncontrolled diabetes and substance abuse.


To: implantdentistry@implantdentistry.com
Could you give a cost range for a front tooth dental implant?
Also, how does an implant compare to other options (bridge, etc.)?
I am 51 and just lost an old football injury/broken tooth. Thank you.
Joe

Dear Joe,

The cost of a dental implant with the restoration is comparable to that
of a traditional three unit bridge. Because only one tooth is involved as
opposed to cutting down additional teeth the implant can be thought of
as being a more conservative approach.
The particular fee varies according to the dental practice and its geographic location.
The surgical fee ranges from $900 to $2000 per implant and the prosthetic
aspect ranges from $500 to $1500 per tooth replaced. Higher fees will occur in
more complex cases.


To: implantdentistry@implantdentistry.com

I need 2 implants. I'm afraid my insurance will declare implants
"experimental" and will not pay.
Sylvia

Dear Sylvia,

Unfortunately,after 3 million implants this procedure is sometimes considered experimental.
Many dental insurance contracts were written in the sixties and have since been "renewed"
not including some of the newer procedures. The other problem is that some of the dental insurers
consider the procedure "medical" in nature while the medical carriers consider it to be a "dental"
situation. Only through the education of the dental consumer will this problem be resolved.
At our office we have had a modicum of success in obtaining benefits for dental implants.
Sometimes the surgery is covered . Also if a tooth is lost during coverage, the crown is
often partially paid for.

 

Dear Dr. Nau,

My fourteen year old daughter has been missing a front tooth since she was nine.
Is it too early to begin treatment?
Thank you,
George

Dear George,

Implant placement should usually only be attempted after all bone growth has ceased.
The services of an orthopedist may be needed to take an x-ray of the wrist to determine
whether growth has ceased. If this is the case, treatment can commence.

 

 More FAQs

 Home

 Top of Page

©2007 implantdentistry.com